Archive for 'Earthworks'

Fuerty Fairy Fort

Fuerty Fairy Fort

Fuerty Fairy Fort, Co. Roscommon
According to Liam Connolly, the fairy fort in sight of his kitchen window was used as a burial ground during the terrible years of the Great Famine. This fact seems only to add to the mysterious atmosphere, as well as the sanctity of the place.

The Giant’s Causeway

The Giant’s Causeway

Portballintrae, Co. Antrim
In legend, these 40,000 interlocking blocks of stone were the first segment of a roadway stretching across the sea to Scotland. It was built, the story goes, by Fionn mac Cumhaill so that he might battle Benandonner, his rival across the sea.

Dún An Óir (Fort del Oro)

Dún An Óir (Fort del Oro)

Ballyferriter, Co. Kerry
There is little left to see at Dún An Óir. The earthworks from the hastily-constructed 1580 fortification have been eroded by weather and waves. There is no evidence of the November day centuries ago when 600 people were slain on this spot.

Tullylin and Carns

Tullylin and Carns

Culleens, Co. Sligo
Is it possible that there might be a connection between an ancient inauguration stone, a nearby fairy fort, and the apparition that appear to four teenage girls on a dark country lane in 1985?

Rathcroghan Royal Site

Rathcroghan Royal Site

Tulsk, Co. Roscommon
Rathcroghan has both a geographic and a symbolic presence. It is an archaeological treasure trove, but it also is the venue of a queen-goddess with the power of conferring legitimacy on the tribal kings of ancient Ireland.

Knock Áine

Knock Áine

Knockainey, Co. Limerick
This sacred hill of the fairy queen Áine, who was known as both sun goddess and love goddess, was a ceremonial site long before the first stirrings of a Celtic mythology. It remains sacred for some visitors today.

Rosses Point: “The Celtic Twilight”

Rosses Point: “The Celtic Twilight”

Rosses, Co. Sligo
“At the northern corner of Rosses is a little promontory of sand and rocks and grass: a mournful, haunted place. No wise peasant would fall asleep under its low cliff…”
William Butler Yeats, “Drumcliff and Rosses”

The King’s Stables

The King’s Stables

Navan, Co. Armagh
Not a natural feature such as a holy well, this artificial pool was dug out, and allowed to fill in with water, to create a ritual site sometime in the first millennium BCE. There is no other site like it in Ireland.

Teltown (Tailteann)

Teltown (Tailteann)

Kells, Co. Meath
The Teltown Fair was said to include Olympic-like competitions of strength and agility, even horse races and staged battles. There was also a nearby spot where young men and women could join in a yearlong trial marriage.

Ballynahatty Giant’s Ring

Ballynahatty Giant’s Ring

Ballynahatty, Co. Down
Unique in the country for its central stone tomb, this monument is the largest enclosed ceremonial space in Ireland. The top of the bank is flat, providing a viewing platform for the rituals enacted here in prehistory.

Ardnamagh Fairy Fort

Ardnamagh Fairy Fort

Moynalty, Co. Meath
Ireland has remnants of more than 45,000 ringforts. There were once many more, now leveled and lost. That so many have survived is due in part to their being known as the homes of the fairies.

Ballyfounder Rath (Tara Fort)

Ballyfounder Rath (Tara Fort)

Portaferry, Co. Down
This monument, known locally as “Tara Fort,” sits on a prominent hilltop southeast of Portaferry, on Northern Ireland’s Ards Peninsula. Thomas McKeating claimed that "these fairies were supposed to be seen sittin’ underneath a tree, singin’ and playin’ their music."

Béal Ború – Brian Boru’s Fort

Béal Ború – Brian Boru’s Fort

Killaloe, Co. Clare
Within a trench dug into the ringfort the archaeologists discovered evidence of a rectangular wooden building, paved with large slabs of stone and containing a central hearth. Can this be where Brian Boru, the “Emperor of the Gael,” lived as a youth?


Copyright © 2014 Voices from the Dawn